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Perth Music Interviews Magazine


Released in December 2011, this is a collection of interviews with 12 people involved in the Perth music scene.

The interviews came together over the course of 2011, mostly by email.

Several of the people have been involved in music for ten years or more, and have done lots of different things with lots of different people. Others are younger, and have released debut CDs in 2011.

The idea was to discuss background and development, as well as current musical activities.

The magazine is 50 pages of text in an A5 printed booklet.

The interviews are with:

  • Ben Stewart (Filmmaker)
  • Amber Flynn (Rabbit Island)
  • Sean O'Neill (Hang on Saint Christopher)
  • Bill Darby (O!, Harry Smith, 10bit Tonsil)
  • David Craddock (Davey Craddock and the Spectacles)
  • Scott Tomlinson (Kill Teen Angst)
  • Thomas Mathieson (Mathas)
  • Joe Bludge (The Painkillers)
  • Tracey Read (The Wine Dark Sea)
  • Rob Schifferli (The Leap Year)
  • Chris Cobilis (The Tigers)
  • Andy Blaikie

Click to buy magazine via PayPal - $AU5.00 including worldwide shipping

"There's this quote that gets thrown about: "Talking about music is like dancing about architecture." Its origins are disputed, though sometimes it's accredited to Frank Zappa. It's pithy, sure, but we're thinking maybe we should take any aphorisms concocted by a dude who named his daughter Moon Unit with a grain of salt.

Benedict Moleta seems to think so, anyway. The debonair songwriter has momentarily traded in his guitar and vocal cords for the written word and a photocopier by way of a new zine, "Perth Music Interviews". The no-frills, 50-page publication documents twelve conversations with savvy local individuals, from filmmakers (Ben Stewart) to rappers (Mathas) to songsters (members of Rabbit Island, Hang On St. Christopher, The Tigers and many more).

A project like "Perth Music Interviews" - in which one man chats to a group of folk who he likes both personally and musically, runs the risk of turning into a cliquey game of back-slapping. Moleta ensures that never happens, through his willingness to talk to a broad range of local characters from varied scenes and backgrounds, and through his ever sagely, probing questions. Rather than pushing an agenda, Moleta simply opens up a spectrum of perspectives - in which lie plenty of pearls of wisdom. If talking about music can be this insightful and absorbing, we can hardly wait to seeing Benedict Moleta dance about architecture sometime soon."
thethousands.com.au